Yet another Semester…

Fall Semester 2013 started with dull pace as the campus looked way emptier than ever before except for the smoking area which gave a splendid scene of the grassy land, the textured architecture, the semi-barren cricket ground and the unique birds and insects that are only seen in TIP.

To start with some good news, I feel proud to share that we celebrate a decade of our online newsletter Quack Online this year. Quack, besides being dormant for some time now, still proved to be the only most successful forums of TIP and a true representation of the student life at TIP. I thank the editors who trusted me with its responsibility but as we enter into our final year, we expect students to stand up, feel proud and start quacking.

Moving on, a heartiest welcome to all the freshmen in the semester of Fall 2013. I wish you all a promising and bright future in the field of textiles. We expect you to understand the importance, norms, environment, values and all the prospects of this institute that will help you in your struggle of prosperity and become worthy of being called a “Texpert“.

Some other news from the campus: Ragging is yet again “strictly banned” because of some recent incidents from some ‘self-called senior second year’ students and ruined all the joyful, passive-constructive and interactive bonding process between the respected seniors and the enthusiastic freshmen. Although I admit that these sessions may get a bit ‘over-rated’ at times but only when it comes down to respect and the arrogant attitude of the freshmen but i should advice the administration to be lenient and less concerned about such activities so to teach them how to adjust in different environments, tackle situations with confidence, respond in the most suitable manner and to groom their personality by observing the personality of the people more experienced than them which includes the honored faculty and the ever-caring seniors. very sorry to turn this fact in that if you don’t teach them to give respect to people with whom they spend their entire day, don’t expect them to respect you for even a single session of mere 1.5 hours.

In the end, we expect our new Associate Dean, Sir Umair Saeed to kindly look up in this matter and to provide us with a positive feedback because we experienced and tolerated much more brutal personal experiences, but that helped us by teaching us not to be the people that we experienced. We appreciate discipline, but we are adults, and we should be strong enough to handle our matters without the involvement of our parents and within the boundaries of this campus.