Designers and Metrosexuality

There is this general perception among people of our society and also throughout the globe that the male associated with textile or fashion designing careers tend to go femme in nature.

Is this true?

I know this fashion giant from Pakistan who conducts ‘No Reservation’ at Dawn, sometimes goes off the tangent in exhibiting certain collected hand gestures, and I cant help but associate him with Begum Nawazish.

But other than that I don’t think pink ties or pierced ears or long hair makes a guy look like a girl. In fact, I believe it’s a test of your masculinity. If you can still throw out a gent’s aura with all that fashion involved, there is absolutely no insecurity you should have with regards to you being a gentleman inside.

Back to the point, why do change in mannerisms happen? Men have been associated with aesthetics and designing clothes and interiors and even objects and cuisines for ages, but never before has this trend of feminism among males emerged as such a distinct characteristic.

Is that bad because guys are supposed to be tall, dark and handsome; and also crude, undisciplined and rowdy?

Or is it good because ‘neatness’ should apply to all irrespective of the genders. And well, what exactly is wrong with being a metrosexual?

Btw are there any metrosexuals at TIP?

12 Replies to “Designers and Metrosexuality”

  1. but never before has this trend of feminism among males emerged as such a distinct characteristic.

    How can you be so sure?

    …guys are supposed to be tall, dark and handsome…

    Says who? Imaginary women with pool table ball eyes, flawless olive skin, hourglass figures, defined shapely curves and retroussé noses?

    …and also crude, undisciplined and rowdy?

    what have you been reading?

  2. “How can you be so sure?”

    I am not. My bad.

    “Says who? Imaginary women with pool table ball eyes, flawless olive skin, hourglass figures, defined shapely curves and retroussé noses?”

    Says I. Obviously some girls like ali zafar better but then they are just one step away from being a homo.

    “what have you been reading?”
    jane eyre was an inspiration.
    😉

  3. Obviously some girls like ali zafar better

    Just ‘some’. And they obviously haven’t seen them without makeup.

    just one step away from being a homo.

    there u have it! And you mentioned Kamiar yourself.

    —xxx—

    I remember this one time a senior was trying to piss off a friend of mine asking her how come women today are so manlike.

    The point being, could the fashion designers and media men turn your argument upside down and say that they only constitute a handful, yet how come most women of today aren’t as femme, cultured, refined and graceful as they used to be 😛

    I’m not taking sides here, only presenting an argument myself. I understand what you’re saying up there, but that one comment of yours is actually offensive and stereotypical 🙂

  4. A good example comes to my mind of the film G.I. Jane, starring Demmi Moore, when she decided to join the Navy Seal, she actually shaved her head to be accepted in a male dominated profession, not only this, while confronting one of her seniors she said “Suck my D…”. Similarly I think fashion designing is a female dominated profession (at least in Pakistan) and men competing against women in this business (especially if they are designing bridal wear for women) have to go through a lot of changes. What do you guys think?

  5. Maybe it’s a certain mindset that’s an initial requirement in the field of fashion design where the male must set aside his male ego to be able to think along those delicate, femme lines and satisfy the female clientele.

  6. Wouldn’t agree with you there, Anonymous. Fashion design is actually quite a male dominated business- here AND all over the world.

    In Pakistan, it’s easier to survive in the fashion industry if you display certain characteristics. The mindset here is that you cannot be a good designer until you talk and act a certain way. It’s like an approval stamp “you’re not feminine, you must be a shitty designer.” And feminine characteristics don’t necessarily make a person gay; one adopts mannerisms from one’s surroundings. Girls who spend a lot of time with their brothers become tomboys (another stereotype i hate), and vice versa. Proximity doesn’t usually change one’s sexual orientation though.

    Similarly, homosexuality has little to do with the field you pursue. Fashion designers, being celebrities, are a lot more obvious than the average Joe who works 9 to 5, then goes to the gym. You’ll find openly gay wrestlers, rugby players, catholic priests (he he), secret service agents; there’s no particular job specification

    PS: And I really don’t see why there’s a problem if a guy takes care of himself and keeps clean. I’d prefer cologne to sweat any day.

  7. @hira

    There is a difference … between taking care of “Himself” AND transforming “himself” into “herself”.

    If anyone ever saw a flamboyantly gay man walking down the street sporting a pink feather boa and sparkles over his eyes, they’d probably cringe and cross the street. But put the same gentleman as head of a fashion design collection and suddenly he’s an “artiste” and not some gay Jose from around the way.

    There is nothing wrong in homosexuality, but there is lotsa problems with identity crisis, when a guy is not sure if he is a guy or girl. Most of guys who join fashion industry as fashion designers are mostly more inclined towards their feminine side, they understand women and can think like them, this is the reason why gay fashion designers are successful around the world.
    I think a man should act like a man, no matter he is homosexual or heterosexual.

  8. This trend of feminism in males has nothing to do with textile/fashion designing. Females are obviously better in these things where men can also do better (being very normal). Feminist style in males can be result of “kay ghar mai sirf aik bhai ho aur baaqi sisters hoon”.

    May be these metrosexuals are mostly found in fashion related fields because they are not accepted/tolerated in other fields. And eventually they start considering themselves better to be a fashion designer.

  9. Females are obviously better in these things

    History strongly contradicts you here. It’s one of those local stereotypes that try to classify creative attributes on basis of gender. Without discussing behavior, start by listing down the number of famous women in fields of design (communication, cuisine, art, architecture, fashion and so on) to that of men.

    May be these metrosexuals are mostly found in fashion related fields because they are not accepted/tolerated in other fields.

    Perhaps you are confusing metrosexual with homosexual (like Hira), or metrosexual with effeminate here (all three terms have different meanings). Whatever you mean, where have you observed this in reality; people turning to fashion after being rejected elsewhere?

  10. History clearly shows that females are always (or say majorly) better in creative works (specially paintings and sculptures) and it also doesen’t means that men are not. Men are also as better as woman are but they are in minority.

    Why you have mostly females in textile designing and fashion designing fields?

    P.S: I have not classified creative attributes on the basis of gender. This is an exceptional case for textile/fashion/design fields.

  11. There’s no concrete evidence that proves women are more or less creative. However, historically speaking, more men have made it to the top in fields of art and literature. There’s no argument over that. Google can help clarify.

    But, another question does arise. Do we see more men excelling in art and literature (historically speaking) because women have always been subjected to oppression? If so, has the situation improved ever since the liberate-women-movement started? I’d like to know.

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